What is glaucoma?

glaucoma_01Glaucoma is a group of diseases that can damage the eye’s optic nerve and result in vision loss and blindness. Glaucoma occurs when the normal fluid pressure inside the eyes slowly rises. However, with early treatment, you can often protect your eyes against serious vision loss. The doctors at Apple Hill Eye Center conduct special tests for the early detection of glaucoma.

Apple Hill Eye Center’s glaucoma specialist has specialized training and expertise in glaucoma treatment.

  1. Congenital glaucoma. Children are born with a defect in the angle of the eye that slows the normal drainage of

Screenshot 2016-07-08 10.05.33Who is at risk for glaucoma?
Anyone can develop glaucoma. Some people are at higher risk than others. They include:

  • African Americans over age 40.
  • Everyone over age 60, especially Mexican Americans.
  • People with a family history of glaucoma.

Symptoms and Detection

glaucoma_02What are the symptoms of glaucoma?
At first, there are no symptoms. Vision stays normal, and there is no pain.

However, as the disease progresses, a person with glaucoma may notice his or her side vision gradually failing. That is, objects in front may still be seen clearly, but objects to the side may be missed.

As glaucoma remains untreated, people may miss objects to the side and out of the corner of their eye. Without treatment, people with glaucoma will slowly lose their peripheral (side) vision. They seem to be looking through a tunnel. Over time, straight-ahead vision may decrease until no vision remains.

Glaucoma can develop in one or both eyes.

Treatment

glaucoma_05Can glaucoma be treated?
Yes. Immediate treatment for early stage, open-angle glaucoma can delay progression of the disease. That’s why early diagnosis is very important.  Glaucoma treatments include medicines, laser trabeculoplasty, conventional surgery, or a combination of any of these. While these treatments may save remaining vision, they do not improve sight already lost from glaucoma.

Contact the team at Apple Hill Eye Center to discuss your individual situation and the best treatment for you.

For more information on the glaucoma, visit this website.